Haridas House - Sankranti Theme - Kondapalli Bommalu

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History suggests that the Haridasu tradition began as part of the Bhakti movement,in an attempt to remind the general public of the glory of Sree VIshnu. Haridasu carry an Akshaya patra on their head.They carry chidatalu in one hand and Tambura in other,tie anklets to their feet and roam streets chanting “Harilo Ranga Hari”. The significant aspect of Haridasu is that he never stops and asks for alms or charity. He doesnot look back even if there is any kind of danger. In fact he doesnot speak at all, only sings eulogies of Lord.The Kondapalli artisan depicts the Haridasu bent down on one knee as the woman pours alms into the Akshaya Patra which he wears as headgear.

 

  • Handmade by Kondapalli Artist
  • Sourced directly from artisans of village
  • Light-weight wooden toys
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  • Disclaimer: Since each toy is handmade and unique, no two toys are perfectly identical. Colours may differ according to the product.

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The Haridasu in colourful attire with garlands and accessories is compared to sage Naradha, the eternal and most dedicated devotee of lord Vishnu. Hailing from the sect of Vaishnavas,these devotees roam in the streets daily chanting the name of the lord throughout the month preceding Sankranti.

History suggests that the Haridasu tradition began as part of the Bhakti movement,in an attempt to remind the general public of the glory of Sree VIshnu. Haridasu carry an Akshaya patra on their head.They carry chidatalu in one hand and Tambura in other,tie anklets to their feet and roam streets chanting “Harilo Ranga Hari”. The significant aspect of Haridasu is that he never stops and asks for alms or charity. He doesnot look back even if there is any kind of danger. In fact he doesnot speak at all, only sings eulogies of Lord.The Kondapalli artisan depicts the Haridasu bent down on one knee as the woman pours alms into the Akshaya Patra which he wears as headgear. She listens to the songs of praise and mythology sung by the Haridasu and acknowledges his call for charity by filling the platter on his head with rice, grain or money. Due to the cultural context of this toy, it makes appearances in the Bommala Koluvu, a gathering of Kondapalli artefacts that mark the season of Sankranti in South India.

Contrary to the popular belief that haridasulu are beggars, they are devoted to a unique cause, a cause to revive the name of the lord and remind the layman of the grace of the Almighty. Along with the name of the lord, they also remind one and all to share and donate at least a handful of grains with other.So this Sankranti, make it a point to mark the festival by celebrating along with a Haridasu.