Lantern Man - Etikoppaka Handicraft

In stock

Light is significant because of the way our instruments of vision are made. If our instruments of vision were made like, let’s say that of an owl, light wouldn’t be very valuable to us. Today you have electric lights so you may wonder why a lamp. But imagine just a few hundred years ago, there was no possibility of doing anything indoors without a lamp. Historically, the lamp was an essential part of our homes because of two reasons. One, there were no electric lights. Two, homes were built from organic materials so people couldn’t afford to open up huge windows. Generally, the houses in ancient times were dark inside. Even today, have you seen that old homes in villages and slums are generally dark. So a lamp was kept even during the day.

  • Handmade by Etikkopaka Artist
  • Sourced directly from artisans of village
  • Light-weight wooden toys
  • Cash-on-delivery payment option available
  • Delivered within 7-days of online purchase
  • Free shipping for purchases above Rs.2500
  • Disclaimer: Since each toy is handmade and unique, no two toys are perfectly identical. Colours may differ according to the product.

Rs. 775.00 Rs. 699.00
-
+
Rs. 699.00

Light is significant because of the way our instruments of vision are made. If our instruments of vision were made like, let’s say that of an owl, light wouldn’t be very valuable to us. Today you have electric lights so you may wonder why a lamp. But imagine just a few hundred years ago, there was no possibility of doing anything indoors without a lamp. Historically, the lamp was an essential part of our homes because of two reasons. One, there were no electric lights. Two, homes were built from organic materials so people couldn’t afford to open up huge windows. Generally, the houses in ancient times were dark inside. Even today, have you seen that old homes in villages and slums are generally dark. So a lamp was kept even during the day.

Etikoppaka's tireless artisans transform popular practises into high-quality art, creating toys that are truly Indian in every sense of the word. With the passage of time, this group of artisans has begun to look for more lucrative occupations. Since these ardent craftsmen are still looking for hope, the few remaining Etikoppaka families adore their ancestral art far too much to leave it.

The sturdy Etikoppaka craftsman sets an example for quality and creativity with his unchanging endurance. One would think that such precision with hand tools is impossible, but certainly not for this skilled craftsman. He takes a Vuli in his hand, picks up a log of Ankudu, and sets out to gouge a metaphor for grace, just as his grandfather did before him.